In this Tuesday, July 18, 2017 photo, a fish swims through part of the Italian World War II shipwreck MV Probitas, with Dive Safety Officer Howard Phoenix of the non-profit RPM Nautical Foundation in the background. On the seabed off the rugged shores of Albania, one of the world’s least explored underwater coastlines, lies a wealth of treasures. Ancient amphorae that carried olive oil and wine; wrecks with hidden tales of heroism and treachery from two world wars; spectacular rock formations and marine life. Photo: Elena Becatoros, AP

In this Tuesday, July 18, 2017 photo, a fish swims through part of the Italian World War II shipwreck MV Probitas, with Dive Safety Officer Howard Phoenix of the non-profit RPM Nautical Foundation in the background. On the seabed off the rugged shores of Albania, one of the world’s least explored underwater coastlines, lies a wealth of treasures. Ancient amphorae that carried olive oil and wine; wrecks with hidden tales of heroism and treachery from two world wars; spectacular rock formations and marine life. Photo: Elena Becatoros, AP

SARANDA, Albania (AP) — Descending beneath the waves, the cloudy first few meters quickly give way to clear waters and an astonishing sight — dozens, perhaps hundreds, of tightly packed ancient vases lie on the seabed, testament to some long-forgotten trader’s unfortunate voyage more than 1,600 years ago.

A short boat ride away, the hulking frame of an Italian World War II ship appears through the gloom, soldiers’ personal items still scattered in the interior, its encrusted railings and propeller now home to growing colonies of fish and sponges.

Off the rugged shores of Albania, one of the world’s least explored underwater coastlines, lies a wealth of treasures: ancient amphorae — long, narrow terracotta vessels — that carried olive oil and wine along trade routes between north Africa and the Roman Empire, wrecks with hidden tales of heroism and treachery from two world wars, and spectacular rock formations and marine life.

“From what I’ve seen so far, you can’t swim more than a few meters without finding something that’s amazing, whether it’s on the cultural history side or the natural history side, here in Albania,” said Derek Smith, a coastal and maritime ecologist and research associate who has been working with the non-profit RPM Nautical Foundation to explore the Albanian coastline for the past decade.

Now Albania’s National Coastline Agency is examining how best to study and protect its sunken attractions while opening them up to visitors in a nation that is virgin territory for the lucrative scuba diving industry.

“The idea of presenting the Albanian underwater heritage is a new idea for the country, because so far there is very little known about the rich history of the Albanian coastline, and in particular the shipwrecks,” said agency head Auron Tare, who has been involved for the past 12 years with RPM Nautical Foundation’s underwater research. “I believe the time has come now that we should present to the world the wealth of this heritage that we have in our waters.”

Source and the original article:
http://www.nhregister.com/news/world/article/Wrecks-sunken-treasures-lie-under-Albania-s-11726630.php#photo-13561727